Fiction Fragment: At the wedding

Everybody pretends to hate weddings. But they all turn up anyway. Maybe it was the free food, or the hope that their contemporaries weren’t doing so well after all. Her asthma was acting up. Perhaps it was the heavy perfumes. She wondered if anyone else knew that exact whiff of heavy silk soaking in sweat. It smelled like stale coconut.

The bride and groom were her classmates. But they weren’t really childhood sweethearts or anything. Probably found nobody else to get married to. A sudden flash of memory. Standing in the assembly, roasting in the summer sun. Uniforms being checked. One arm distance from the person ahead of her in the line. Reciting the national pledge together. “India is my country. All Indians are my brothers and sisters.

It makes her want to throw up. She didn’t know what was more revolting. The idea of state-sponsored incest or the thought that all the awful people she was in the midst of were somehow related to her. Why on earth did they have to declare all Indians to be their siblings? She would have to find someone from another country now.

24 Comments

Filed under Photographs, Poetry and Fiction

24 Responses to Fiction Fragment: At the wedding

  1. n

    some kids in my class used to add ‘except one’ between ‘all indians’ and ‘are my brothers and ..’

  2. haha, romba chamathu! :)

  3. he he….i remember we used to chant it as, all indians, with a few exceptions ……

    ;)

  4. Silky

    ur posts never fail to cheer me up! excellent, as always..

  5. Hahahaha… Nice one.. I’ve always found the pledge rather funny.

  6. Unga isckool la solli tharlaya? That is why Rajiv Gandhi married Sonia.

  7. The middle para felt so cliched.Otherwise the post was awesome,like your older posts.ur blog is a frqnt hangout for some quality posts….:-)

  8. “She wondered if anyone else knew that exact whiff of heavy silk soaking in sweat. It smelled like stale coconut.”

    More like a mix between coconut water and milk that is on its way to thairu.

  9. the idea and execution, rendummey not upto your usual standard :-(

  10. Why all this fuss? The way Indians are growing, I dont see that they have taken this pledge literally.
    And, I like to see my husband as a brother sometimes…someone to bully.

  11. A tad easier to bring in the supposedly intriguing (and disgusting) subject of incest in, to (august) audiences when posting requires that you use all the travails of our ill preached morals. Much appreciated!

  12. km

    And where does that leave the transgender people? “All Indians are my brothers and sisters and some of them are both”?

  13. there are a lot of nepalies, bhutanese, srilankans in India. She might just have to make do with one of them :P

  14. Mixed reactions on this one. :) I know the story isn’t too great – but a dash of mild evil seems very appropriate.

  15. i studied in a convent and everytime we recited the national pledge, we’d say, “All Indians are my brothers and sisters, expect one”. I think i should have gone for a greater no. was too naive then ;)

  16. we are such an incestuous bunch!

    of course its a known fact that everybody loves a good wedding (especially the food) except the victims… ahem, the bride and the groom!

  17. Sriram

    I think we were bit too clever. We added “except a few” to the “all Indians are my brothers and sisters part”. :)

  18. Pingback: If I had my way, I’ll have all of them sued « Krishnan Palaniappan

  19. although ‘all Indians’ includes mom & dad.. and we naturally understood the expectations.. same would apply.. atleast that might be thought behind. and yes yes.. iam stupid enough even to explain that..;))